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INSTAAR News

Katharine Suding receives Ecological Society of America Robert H. MacArthur award

Katharine Suding receives Ecological Society of America Robert H. MacArthur award

The Ecological Society of America (ESA) has awarded Katherine N. Suding its prestigious Robert H. MacArthur Award. Suding, fellow of the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, is a leader in community ecology.

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Townsend to join Colorado College as Provost

Townsend to join Colorado College as Provost

INSTAAR director Alan R. Townsend will be joining Colorado College as that institution's provost on the first of June, 2018.

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The future of flood mapping: Making a difference in flood response and modeling

The Dartmouth Flood Observatory has been providing interactive flood maps for natural disaster responders and planners for 20 years. The DFO is developing new ways of combining satellite imagery and geographic information systems to help identify areas prone to flooding in a changing climate.

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INSTAAR at AGU: Find us at our talks and posters at #AGU17

A list of INSTAAR talks and posters at the 2017 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in New Orleans.

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The hard science of soft substances: Julio Sepúlveda uses lipids to decode ancient ecosystems

The hard science of soft substances: Julio Sepúlveda uses lipids to decode ancient ecosystems

Julio Sepúlveda is a unique fossil-hunter. Rather than the hard exoskeletons of ancient organisms, Sepúlveda analyzes a softer biological component, fats. He looks at the distribution of organic molecules in nature from soils and sediments to lakes and the ocean, with a focus mostly on lipids, the molecular constituent of fat. He uses this data to not only reconstruct ancient environments but also to contribute to predictions for how our current climate might respond to similar environmental conditions.

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Muddy waters: First mapping of Greenland sedimentation rates shows a turbulent system

Muddy waters: First mapping of Greenland sedimentation rates shows a turbulent system

A new study has measured the sediment carried by Greenland’s rivers to the ocean, with implications for marine ecosystems, carbon in the ocean, and dynamics of the coastal zone. Led by INSTAAR researchers and published today in Nature Geoscience, the study is the first to quantify in detail the concentrations of sediment in rivers flowing from Greenland to the sea.

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