News & Events

Research Theme: Biosphere

News

Pizza at the ends of the earth

Pizza at the ends of the earth

Last Month, Michael Gooseff, Principal Investigator for the McMurdo Dry Valleys LTER and his team had the opportunity to host TV personality Anthony Bourdain of CNN’s Parts Unknown. Boudain, most famous for his exotic culinary exploits, sat down with Gooseff and his team to share a pizza in one of the most remote places on earth - Antarctica.

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Season of intense melting in Antarctica offers insights into continent’s future

A single season of intense melting that affected Antarctica between 2001 and 2002 offers new insights into the southernmost continent's ecological future and the potential impact of climate change worldwide, according to observations collected in a series of papers and published in the journal BioScience.

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Submit papers for AAAR journal’s special issue about West Greenland environments

Submit papers for AAAR journal’s special issue about West Greenland environments

Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research (AAAR) has announced a Call for Papers for a special issue to be published in 2017: “Environmental Change and Impacts in the Kangerlussuaq Area, West Greenland”

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Investigating water and wine: Former postdoc returns to INSTAAR as biogeochemistry prof, researcher

Investigating water and wine: Former postdoc returns to INSTAAR as biogeochemistry prof, researcher

Biogeochemist Eve-Lyn Hinckley, who was a postdoctoral fellow at INSTAAR from 2009 to 2011, has returned to CU as an assistant professor for INSTAAR and the Environmental Studies program. Hinckley will teach three courses annually, conduct research on sulfur and nitrogen in ecosystems, and eventually take over as director of INSTAAR’s Kiowa Lab, an environmental chemistry laboratory for the Niwot Ridge Long-Term Ecological Research Program.

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Explaining biodiversity patterns: An Antarctic case study

Explaining biodiversity patterns: An Antarctic case study

Scientists have developed a new theory to explain patterns in biodiversity, and tested it on bacteria in the soils of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica. Their study was published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

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INSTAAR at AGU: Talks, posters, and sessions at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

INSTAAR faculty and graduate students will share new research at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco, 15 to 19 December. They will present new research on abrupt climate change, air quality and fracking, polar climate change, atmospheric chemistry, flood impacts, forests and snow, plants and soils, and past climates.

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Sustainable Deltas 2015 launches in Rotterdam

Sustainable Deltas 2015 launches in Rotterdam

A unique initiative, Sustainable Deltas 2015 (SD2015), launched today at the Deltas in Times of Climate Change II International Conference in Rotterdam. The aim of the initiative is to focus attention and research on the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide, and enhance international and regional cooperation among scientists, policymakers and other stakeholders.

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“Wicked problems” to be subject of symposium on coupled human–natural systems

Patrick Bourgeron and Jelena Vukomanovic will convene a special symposium on “wicked problems” in coupled human and natural systems at the 2014 US-IALE Annual Symposium in Anchorage, Alaska, on Wednesday, May 21.

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Apples in Atebes: Cultivating climate resilience in an Ethiopian village

Apples in Atebes: Cultivating climate resilience in an Ethiopian village

Tsegay Wolde-Georgis, of the INSTAAR program Consortium for Capacity Building (CCB), is leading a project to introduce the cultivation of apple trees irrigated by water-filled, buried clay pots to the mountainous, dry region of Atebes, a village of 4000 people in northern Ethiopia. Over the last 30 years, land degradation and climate change have exacerbated existing constraints of drought, soil erosion, deforestation, poor food supply consisting entirely of cereal grains, and lack of access to water. The goal of the clay pot project is to improve the resiliency of the community to climate-related hazards through demonstration and capacity building. So far, the project has led not only to the cultivation of high-value fruits and vegetables, but to erosion control and improved water supplies.

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INSTAAR at AGU: Talks, posters, and sessions at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

INSTAAR faculty and graduate students will share their research at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting (http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/) held in San Francisco, 9 to 13 December. They will present new research on abrupt climate change, atmospheric chemistry, geomorphology, rivers and oceans, forests and snow, plants and soils, past climates, flood monitoring, Antarctic volcanoes, coastal erosion, and emissions from energy production.

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Down to Earth: Meet an INSTAAR scientist and a renowned photographer on their home ground

Down to Earth: Meet an INSTAAR scientist and a renowned photographer on their home ground

Meet the people behind the science—and art—resulting from INSTAAR research, featured in two recent EARTH Magazine interviews.

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Students conduct alpine fieldwork on effects of climate change and air pollution

Students conduct alpine fieldwork on effects of climate change and air pollution

Meet two undergraduate students working in the alpine environment of the Mountain Research Station, where topics studied range from plant and animal ecology to hydrology and atmospheric science. The undergraduate experience at the station provides students with hands-on training in advanced research techniques at what is widely regarded as the best known site in the world specializing in alpine environmental science.

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Fields of gold: Can camelina be a biofuel that high country farmers could grow and use themselves?

Fields of gold: Can camelina be a biofuel that high country farmers could grow and use themselves?

Using computer models, Keske and her colleagues are looking at a new crop that might help farmers in Colorado, Montana, and other high and dry regions earn extra income and achieve energy independence. Their new study asks if, and when, it would be profitable for farmers to grow Camelina sativa (camelina) as a biofuel and a high-protein meal for livestock feed. The new study evaluated costs, risks, and crop rotation to see if raising camelina can be profitable for farmers, using results from field trials at Colorado farms and agricultural experiment stations.

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Undergraduate Hana Fancher designs own research project melding environmental science, engineering

Undergraduate Hana Fancher designs own research project melding environmental science, engineering

Hana Fancher didn't wait for graduation to change the world. The undergraduate developed her own research project studying methane emissions from palm oil plantation wastewater ponds—a project that encouraged the plantation to build an anaerobic digester to power its processing and reduce greenhouse gases.

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CU-led mountain forest study shows vulnerability to climate change

CU-led mountain forest study shows vulnerability to climate change

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study that ties forest “greenness” in the western United States to fluctuating year-to-year snowpack indicates mid-elevation mountain ecosystems are most sensitive to rising temperatures and changes in precipitation and snowmelt. Led by CU-Boulder researcher Ernesto Trujillo and Assistant Professor Noah Molotch, the study team identified the threshold where mid-level forests sustained primarily by moisture change to higher-elevation forests sustained primarily by sunlight and temperature. Being able to identify this “tipping point” is important because it is in the mid-level forests--at altitudes from roughly 6,500 to 8,000 feet--where many people live and play in the West and which are associated with increasing wildfires, beetle outbreaks and increased tree mortality.

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Increase in metal concentrations in Rocky Mountain watershed tied to warming temperatures

Increase in metal concentrations in Rocky Mountain watershed tied to warming temperatures

Warmer air temperatures since the 1980s may explain significant increases in zinc and other metal concentrations of ecological concern in a Rocky Mountain watershed, reports a new study led by CU-Boulder and the USGS. Rising concentrations of zinc and other metals in the upper Snake River just west of the Continental Divide near Keystone, Colo., may be the result of falling water tables, melting permafrost and accelerating mineral weathering rates, all driven by warmer air temperatures in the watershed. Researchers observed a fourfold increase in dissolved zinc over the last 30 years during the month of September.

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Too much of a good thing: Alpine plants under threat in Rocky Mountain National Park

Too much of a good thing: Alpine plants under threat in Rocky Mountain National Park

Nitrogen compounds from power plants, automobiles, and agriculture is creating air pollution that is changing the alpine vegetation in Rocky Mountain National Park, says a new study by INSTAAR Fellow William Bowman and colleagues.

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Front Range environment is changing fast, LTER studies find

Front Range environment is changing fast, LTER studies find

Six papers published this month in the journal BioScience report on ecological changes at 26 research sites, including INSTAAR’s Niwot Ridge site, adjacent to the Mountain Research Station west of Boulder. They indicate that ecosystems dependent on seasonal snow and ice are the most sensitive to changes in climate.

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Diane McKnight elected to National Academy of Engineering

Diane McKnight elected to National Academy of Engineering

Diane M. McKnight has been elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), among the highest professional distinctions accorded an engineer, for elucidating the interrelationship between natural organic matter and heavy metals in streams and lakes.

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Mark Williams elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

Mark Williams elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

Mark W. Williams has been elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Fellowship is conferred on less than 0.1% of the 60,000 AGU members from 148 countries in any given year and recognizes scientists who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences. The primary criteria for evaluation are major breakthroughs or discoveries and paradigm shifts. Williams was elected "for outstanding research that has made fundamental advances in mountain hydrology and biogeochemistry."

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Stream Team student blogs from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

Stream Team student blogs from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

INSTAAR graduate student Alia Khan is blogging from one of the most remote field sites in the world. She is sending posts to the New York Times “Scientists at Work” series from a campsite in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica.

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NSF awards INSTAAR largest environmental sciences award in CU-Boulder history

NSF awards INSTAAR largest environmental sciences award in CU-Boulder history

A $5.9 million grant for alpine ecosystem research will allow INSTAAR to continue for six years its intensive studies of long-term ecological changes in Colorado's high mountains, both natural and human-caused, over decades and centuries. The grant is the largest environmental sciences award in CU-Boulder history.

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Stream paradox solved? Study uncovers why alga feasts where it should starve

Stream paradox solved? Study uncovers why alga feasts where it should starve

The diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as a notorious invasive species in river systems around the world. Didymo is able to colonize and dominate the bottoms of some of the world’s cleanest waterways, forming thick mats. A team of scientists, including INSTAAR Sarah Spaulding, examined how high algal biomass is formed in low-nutrient conditions.

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James Syvitski appointed Chair of International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme

James Syvitski appointed Chair of International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme

The International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme has announced that James Syvitski will chair the Scientific Committee, IGBP's main decision-making body, beginning 1 January 2012. Sponsored by the International Council for Science, the IGBP is an international research program to study the phenomenon of global change and provide the scientific leadership to improve Earth's sustainability.

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High school students work with INSTAAR researchers, win awards at Colorado science fair

High school students work with INSTAAR researchers, win awards at Colorado science fair

New Vista High School students Kelly Muller and Remy Barrows-O’Neal won several awards at the 56th Colorado Science and Engineering Fair April 7-9 for their project “How Climate Affects the Spread of Invasive Species.” They worked with INSTAAR graduate students Janet Prevéy and David Knochel in Tim Seastedt’s terrestrial ecology lab to study the effect of varying rainfall amounts on the competitive ability of an invasive grass (cheatgrass) grown in competition with a native species (western wheatgrass).

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Authors, teachers, scientists come together to advance children’s book series

Authors, teachers, scientists come together to advance children’s book series

Colorado teachers and scientific researchers joined forces with authors, illustrators, and book publishers at INSTAAR to work out next steps for the popular LTER Schoolyard Children’s Book Series, which includes My Water Comes from the Mountains, The Lost Seal, and Sea Secrets. They discussed how to develop web-accessible curricula associated with each book and move ahead with Spanish-language editions.

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Reducing “rock snot” in Boulder Creek

INSTAAR researchers have discovered the mechanisms behind blooms of an invasive alga in Boulder Creek--and a simple solution.

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Curbing invasive plant species in the Boulder region

Tim Seastedt and colleagues have been awarded a $500,000 grant to help reduce invasive plant species in the Boulder region. They will be employing research, modeling and outreach in partnership with Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks (OSMP). The project will focus on three weed species viewed as threats to the conservation goals of OSMP, including Dalmation toadflax, Canada thistle and cheatgrass.

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Beyond aluminum: New extreme of soil acidification found in Tatra Mountains

Bill Bowman, Cory Cleveland (former INSTAAR, U. of Montana), and colleagues at the Slovak Academy of Science and the U.S. Geological survey have found that vegetation and soils already subjected to long-term acid rain could face even more stress in the form of nitrogen-laden precipitation.

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As Andean glacier retreats, tiny life forms move in

A CU-Boulder team working at 16,400 feet in the Peruvian Andes has discovered how barren soils uncovered by retreating glacier ice can swiftly establish a thriving community of microbes, setting the table for lichens, mosses and alpine plants.

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Humans continue to transform the global nitrogen cycle at a record pace, study finds

Alan Townsend and other members of the International Nitrogen Initiative (INI) North American Nitrogen Center have published a review of human influence on the global nitrogen cycle in Science.

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Boulder High School students present study at Intel International Science Fair

Boulder High School seniors Anna Hermann, Kelly Lane, and Danielle Pite were invited to the prestigious 2008 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for their team project “Didymosphenia geminata: The core question,” mentored by USGS Ecologist and INSTAAR affiliate Sarah Spaulding.

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Conservation, restoration strategies must shift with global environmental change

Tim Seastedt and colleagues investigated ecosystem management studies from the past 12 years in an effort to determine best practices for the future. They propose that biologists and managers focus on making existing ecosystems resilient to further environmental change rather than on attempting to restore them to their original state.

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Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory established

A University of Colorado team led by INSTAAR Suzanne Anderson was awarded funding by the National Science Foundation for a five-year project to establish a Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in the Boulder Creek Watershed.

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Atmospheric monitoring course taught to international group of scientists

Detlev Helmig was invited to teach a course on monitoring of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to an international group of scientists, including participants from several eastern European countries, Algeria, Kenya, and Indonesia.

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New book: Human Ecology of Beringia

John Hoffecker and Scott Elias have produced a synthesis of environment and human settlement in Beringia, published by Columbia University Press.

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Fireproofing homes dramatically reduces forest fire size

Patrick Bourgeron and colleagues modeled the spread of fires in forest ecosystems in several Western states. Their study is the first to systematically look at both houses and trees in forest fire scenarios.

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Gifford Miller interviewed for NOVA documentary on Australian Pleistocene megafauna

Gifford Miller provided commentary for Bone Diggers, a new NOVA documentary on the discovery of pristine skeletal remains of Pleistocene megafauna in remote Australian limestone caves.

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Niwot Ridge selected as a core site for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON)

NEON is the largest ecological project ever attempted by the National Science Foundation--the first national ecological measurement and observation system designed both to answer regional- to continental-scale scientific questions and to have the interdisciplinary participation necessary to achieve credible ecological forecasting and prediction.

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Chance encounter with seal leads to children’s book on Antarctica

Chance encounter with seal leads to children’s book on Antarctica

Diane McKnight has published a children's book, The Lost Seal, that describes an unexpected encounter with a seal pup in the Dry Valleys region of Antarctica, more than five miles inland from the sea.

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Undergraduate mentoring: Sunlight’s effect on aquatic organic matter

Undergraduate Cuong Huynh (CU-Boulder) is being mentored by Natalie Mladenov and Diane McKnight on a project to uncover new ways in which sunlight affects aquatic organic matter.

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Cottonwoods studied at Sand Creek Massacre site

Jeff Lukas and Connie Woodhouse, assisted by Henry Adams, found evidence that "witness trees" are still present at the recently established Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site in southeastern Colorado.

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Alan Townsend named director of North American Nitrogen Center

Alan Townsend was named director of the North American Nitrogen Center (NANC), one of five centers around the world that together comprise the core structure of the SCOPE and IGBP sanctioned International Nitrogen Initiative (INI).

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Grad student pens educational diary about science in Antarctica

Karen Cozzetto was the main contributor to an educational website, 77 Degrees South, that showcases the life, times, and research of several groups of scientists working in the largest ice-free region of Antarctica: the McMurdo Dry Valleys.

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Ancient diets of Australian birds point to big ecosystem changes

Gifford Miller led an international team to discover that the diet of two flightless birds inhabiting Australia shifted soon after humans arrived ca. 50,000 years ago, coincident with a rapid and dramatic shift in the ecosystem's flora. Their discovery is the best evidence yet that early humans may have altered the continent's interior with fire, changing it from a mosaic of trees, shrubs, and grasses to the desert scrub evident today.

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Nitrogen fertilization of soil puts rare plant species at risk

Rare plant species are six times more likely than abundant species to be lost due to nitrogen fertilization of soil, researchers have found through experiments conducted across nine ecosystems in North America, including on Niwot Ridge.

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Novel taxonomic web site assists ecological research in Antarctica

Sarah Spaulding, Rhea Esposito, and David Lubinski led a team of scientists, graduate students and undergraduate students to develop a dynamic web database, "Antarctic Freshwater Diatoms," that combines ecological data collected over more than a decade in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region.

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Arid Australian interior linked to landscape burning by ancient humans

Landscape burning by ancient hunters and gatherers may have triggered the failure of the annual Australian Monsoon some 12,000 years ago, resulting in the desertification of the country's interior that is evident today, according to a new study.

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Tim Seastedt wins Pacesetter Environment Award

Tim Seastedt won the 2005 Boulder County Pacesetter Environment award from the Daily Camera newspaper for his work on biological pest control of diffuse knapweed, an aggressive noxious weed that infests about 100,000 acres locally and 3 million acres in the West.

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NSF awards CU-Boulder $4.9 million for alpine ecosystem research

An intensive University of Colorado at Boulder project charting long-term ecological changes in the high mountains of Colorado will continue for at least six more years as a result of a $4.9 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

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First evidence of life in rock glaciers

A University of Colorado at Boulder research team has discovered evidence of microbial activity in a rock glacier high above tree line in the Rocky Mountains, a barren environment previously thought to be devoid of life.

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Loss of diversity in mountain areas

Bill Bowman was interviewed for the Earth and Sky radio program to help listeners better understand the science of biodiversity studies and the consequences of its loss in mountain areas.

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INSTAAR researchers featured in CU’s annual report on Sponsored Research

The LTER research on alpine lake ecosystems by Diane McKnight and Rose Cory were featured in the report on Sponsored Research for the University of Colorado at Boulder, fiscal year 2003-2004.

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Greenland ice core project yields probable ancient plant remains

A team of international researchers working on the North Greenland Ice Core Project recently recovered what appear to be plant remnants nearly two miles below the surface between the bottom of the glacial ice and the bedrock.

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Grasslands “BioBlitz” volunteers to survey Jefferson and Boulder Counties for biodiversity

More than 100 plant and animal experts will survey 6,000 acres of publicly owned and managed grasslands in Jefferson and Boulder counties June 25 and June 26 in a 24-hour scramble to identify as many species as possible, known as a biodiversity blitz.

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Ecology for a crowded planet

Alan Townsend participated in a Policy Forum in Science magazine 28 May to describe changes that are required if we hope to meet the needs and aspirations of humans while improving the health of our planet's ecosystems.

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INSTAAR-mentored high school students win science fair prizes

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High-elevation climate change: A new model for ecosystems

Tim Seastedt, Bill Bowman, Nel Caine, Diane McKnight, Alan Towsend, and Mark Williams (Niwot Ridge LTER PIs) published a key conceptual paper, "The Landscape Continuum: A Model for High-Elevation Ecosystems," in volume 54, no. 2 of Bioscience. Their paper employs a new conceptual model that links terrestrial ecosystems to each other and to aquatic ecosystems.

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Diane McKnight named fellow of American Geophysical Union

Diane McKnight was elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union for her outstanding contributions to the understanding of the biogeochemistry associated with transport metals and organic substances in streams and lakes.

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New CU-Boulder study shows increase in fungal metabolism under tundra snow

A new University of Colorado at Boulder study has shown that microbes living under the tundra snow pack ramp up their populations in late winter, a finding with implications for changing estimates of carbon dioxide levels in Earth's atmosphere.

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Global warming threatens alpine plants

Vera Markgraf was an invited lecturer at a week-long international summer school concentrating on “Climate Change: Impacts on Terrestrial Ecosystems.”

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Changing global nitrogen cycle impacting human health, says study

Despite greatly increasing food production for humans, the growing use of nitrogen as a nutrient is affecting people's health far beyond just the benefits of growing more crops, according to a new University of Colorado at Boulder-led study led by Alan Townsend

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Diatoms on TV

Sarah Spaulding appeared on the Court TV special "Digging for Clues" on December 14, 2002.

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CU-Boulder researchers excavate mammoth skull

James Dixon and his colleagues excavated the skull and tusks of a mammoth that died more than 10,000 years ago at Lamb Spring, an archeological site that was once a freshwater spring near Roxborough State Park, Douglas County, Colorado.

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Wildfires will hurt Colorado water quality and fish, CU-Boulder expert says

Mark Williams, Graduate Student John Gartner (Advisor: Nel Caine), and their colleagues are researching water quality and erosion issues related to wildfires. Williams predicts that Colorado's record-setting wildfire season will leave behind potentially harmful conditions in water supplies.

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Colorado alpine lakes show troubling changes

Diane McKnight, with colleagues including several graduate and undergraduate students, studied a high alpine lake in the Colorado Rockies that shows increased algal growth thought to be caused by changing climate and atmospheric nitrogen deposition from auto emissions and agricultural activity on the heavily populated Front Range.

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Scientist Tim Seastedt honored in U.S. House of Representatives

Tim Seastedt was officially acknowledged for his important weed control research by Representative Udall of Colorado. Udall said "Professor Seastedt's exciting and path-breaking research on using insects and soil chemistry to control the spread of noxious, non-native plants holds promise in addressing a vexing--and spreading--problem, especially on our western lands."

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INSTAAR researchers receive grant to study noxious weed

Tim Seastedt, Kate LeJeune, and Katie Suding have received a $280,000 grant to help unlock the mystery of how diffuse knapweed, a noxious weed that has infested more than 80,000 acres along the Front Range and 3.2 million acres in the West, has become dominant in the prairies around Boulder.

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Colorado’s drought plan considers paleoclimatic record

Connie Woodhouse was cited in the recently published Colorado Drought Mitigation and Response Plan for her dendroclimatological work showing persistent periods of drought lasting longer than droughts in the instrumental record.

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Changes in Australian ecosystems tied to arrival of exotic animals

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CU-Boulder awarded $2.6 million from NSF for Carbon, Climate and Society study

A $2.6 million National Science Foundation grant to the University of Colorado at Boulder will allow scores of students from the natural sciences, social sciences and journalism fields to join forces and explore novel solutions to environmental problems.

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In The News

Long-term ecological study to continue at very special site, Niwot Ridge

Thanks to a $6.8 million renewal grant to CU Boulder’s Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR) from the National Science Foundation (NSF), research at the Niwot Ridge study area – one of NSF’s 25 Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites in North America – will continue for another six years.

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Humans, not climate change, wiped out Australian megafauna

New evidence involving the ancient poop of some of the huge and astonishing creatures that once roamed Australia indicates the primary cause of their extinction around 45,000 years ago was likely a result of humans, not climate change. A team of researchers from Monash University in Victoria, Australia, and INSTAAR used information from a sediment core drilled in the Indian Ocean off the coast of southwest Australia to help reconstruct past climate and ecosystems on the continent. The sediment core allowed scientists to look back in time, in this case more than 150,000 years, spanning Earth’s last full glacial cycle. Fungal spores from plant-eating mammal dung were abundant in the sediment core layers from 150,000 years ago to about 45,000 years ago, when they went into a nosedive.

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How a Boulder ecologist plans to save fish with maggots

Philip Taylor's insect refinery in the low foothills of Boulder County is just about as far from the ocean as you could get. But Taylor, an ecology researcher at the University of Colorado and the founder of Mad Agriculture, thinks the larvae growing inside could save marine ecosystems.

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Can this Colorado farmer save our oceans?

Boulder scientist Philip Taylor’s answer to sustainable fish and animal feed lies in farming fast-breeding flies. Take a look inside his facility and process.

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Count seals in Antarctica from the comfort of your couch: Citizen science project

Scientists (including INSTAAR Sharon Stammerjohn) are asking the public to look through thousands of satellite images of Antarctica to assist in the first-ever, comprehensive count of Weddell seals. Counting seals will help scientists better protect and conserve the pristine Ross Sea and wildlife in the area, like Antarctic toothfish (Chilean sea bass).

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Grand Challenge expanded and enhanced by new projects

CU-Boulder’s Grand Challenge, launched in September 2014, is the university’s response to President Obama’s nationwide call to pursue the Grand Challenges of the 21st Century, “ambitious but achievable goals that harness science, technology, and innovation to solve important national or global problems and that have the potential to capture the public’s imagination.” “Our Space, Our Future” fuses CU-Boulder’s unique strengths in earth, space and social sciences with new technologies and partners to address the pace and pattern of changes for our environment, our resources and our planet. Seed grants awarded by the Offices of the Provost and the Vice Chancellor for Research introduce new and promising research into the already vibrant mix of Grand Challenge projects. Awardees include Multi-Scale Modeling and Measurement of Ecosystem Sensitivity to Water and Energy Availability, led by INSTAAR researchers Lauren Tomkinson and Noah Molotch.

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Events

PhD thesis defense: Adam Wlostowski

Thursday, April 6th at 12:00pm

SEEC room S225

PhD thesis defense: Eric Winchell

Friday, April 7th at 9:00am

Benson room 380

View all INSTAAR Biosphere science and research >