News & Events

Research Theme: Solid Earth

News

INSTAAR at AGU: Talks, posters, and sessions at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

INSTAAR faculty and graduate students will share new research at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco, 15 to 19 December. They will present new research on abrupt climate change, air quality and fracking, polar climate change, atmospheric chemistry, flood impacts, forests and snow, plants and soils, and past climates.

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INSTAAR at AGU: Talks, posters, and sessions at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

INSTAAR faculty and graduate students will share their research at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting (http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/) held in San Francisco, 9 to 13 December. They will present new research on abrupt climate change, atmospheric chemistry, geomorphology, rivers and oceans, forests and snow, plants and soils, past climates, flood monitoring, Antarctic volcanoes, coastal erosion, and emissions from energy production.

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CU-Boulder-led team to study effects of natural gas development

CU-Boulder-led team to study effects of natural gas development

The NSF has awarded a $12 million grant to a CU-Boulder-led team, including the leaders of the CWERC research center, to explore ways to maximize the benefits of natural gas development while minimizing negative impacts on ecosystems and communities. The team will examine social, ecological and economic aspects of the development of natural gas resources, including fracking, and the protection of air and water resources. The project will focus on the Rocky Mountain region, where natural gas development, as well as objections to it, are increasing.

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John Behrendt elected president of American Polar Society

John C. Behrendt was elected President of the prestigious American Polar Society in spring 2006.

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Two CU-Boulder faculty elected AAAS fellows in 2002

Two University of Colorado at Boulder faculty, including INSTAAR's John Behrendt, have been elected fellows of the prestigious American Association for the Advancement of Science for 2002.

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John Andrews honored with special sessions at Geological Society of America Annual Meeting

The Geological Society of America honored John Andrews' tremendous impact on the Quaternary sciences at the annual meeting with two special sessions entitled "Quaternary Sciences from Land to Sea: In Honor of John T. Andrews."

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In The News

Geology students learn just how much Iceland rocks

Undergraduate geology students spent two weeks this summer on Iceland in an innovative field course that resulted from a partnership between CU-Boulder and the University of Iceland, which have long worked together at the PhD level but have not previously collaborated on undergraduate education. G. Lang Farmer and Giff Miller of CU-Boulder, and Áslaug Geirsdóttir of the University of Iceland, donate their time to plan and conduct the summer field course.

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Laying the groundwork for data-driven science: NSF announces $31 million in awards

One of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) priority goals is to improve the nation's capacity in data science by investing in the development of infrastructure, building multi-institutional partnerships to increase the number of U.S. data scientists and augmenting the usefulness and ease of using data. As part of that effort, NSF today announced $31 million in new funding to support 17 innovative projects under the Data Infrastructure Building Blocks (DIBBs) program. One of the programs is led by INSTAAR researcher Chris Jenkins.

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Source of mysterious medieval eruption identified

Last year, a team of scientists led by INSTAAR geochemist Gifford Miller strengthened the link between a historic volcanic eruption and the onset of the Little Ice Age by using radiocarbon dating of dead plant material from beneath the ice caps on Baffin Island and Iceland, as well as ice and sediment core data, to determine that the cold summers and ice growth began abruptly between 1275 and 1300 C.E. New research by volcanologist Franck Lavigne of the Université Paris and colleagues may have identified the volcano in question: Indonesia’s Samalas.

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Volcanic eruptions emerge as lead cause for Little Ice Age

The Little Ice Age began in the late 13th century, scientists now posit, and lasted about 400 years. Some regions cooled significantly. A series of volcanic eruptions has become a leading culprit.

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Events

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