News & Events

Research Theme: Terrestrial Hydrosphere

News

Muddy waters: First mapping of Greenland sedimentation rates shows a turbulent system

Muddy waters: First mapping of Greenland sedimentation rates shows a turbulent system

A new study has measured the sediment carried by Greenland’s rivers to the ocean, with implications for marine ecosystems, carbon in the ocean, and dynamics of the coastal zone. Led by INSTAAR researchers and published today in Nature Geoscience, the study is the first to quantify in detail the concentrations of sediment in rivers flowing from Greenland to the sea.

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Pizza at the ends of the earth

Pizza at the ends of the earth

Last Month, Michael Gooseff, Principal Investigator for the McMurdo Dry Valleys LTER and his team had the opportunity to host TV personality Anthony Bourdain of CNN’s Parts Unknown. Boudain, most famous for his exotic culinary exploits, sat down with Gooseff and his team to share a pizza in one of the most remote places on earth - Antarctica.

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Recent storms recouped 37 percent of California’s five-year snow-water deficit

Recent storms recouped 37 percent of California’s five-year snow-water deficit

The recent “atmospheric river” weather pattern that pummeled California with storms from late December to late January may have recouped 37 percent of the state’s five-year snow-water deficit, according to new University of Colorado Boulder-led research.

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Season of intense melting in Antarctica offers insights into continent’s future

A single season of intense melting that affected Antarctica between 2001 and 2002 offers new insights into the southernmost continent's ecological future and the potential impact of climate change worldwide, according to observations collected in a series of papers and published in the journal BioScience.

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Submit papers for AAAR journal’s special issue about West Greenland environments

Submit papers for AAAR journal’s special issue about West Greenland environments

Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research (AAAR) has announced a Call for Papers for a special issue to be published in 2017: “Environmental Change and Impacts in the Kangerlussuaq Area, West Greenland”

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Water and natural gas: Win some, lose less?

Natural gas has been touted as a “bridge fuel” which would allow us to transition towards cleaner alternatives in the future while leaning away from emission-heavy carbon based fuels. We looked at some of the atmospheric consequences for using natural gas last week, and this week we’re taking a closer look at water. Water lost to fracking may be mitigated by water savings during power generation.

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Investigating water and wine: Former postdoc returns to INSTAAR as biogeochemistry prof, researcher

Investigating water and wine: Former postdoc returns to INSTAAR as biogeochemistry prof, researcher

Biogeochemist Eve-Lyn Hinckley, who was a postdoctoral fellow at INSTAAR from 2009 to 2011, has returned to CU as an assistant professor for INSTAAR and the Environmental Studies program. Hinckley will teach three courses annually, conduct research on sulfur and nitrogen in ecosystems, and eventually take over as director of INSTAAR’s Kiowa Lab, an environmental chemistry laboratory for the Niwot Ridge Long-Term Ecological Research Program.

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Scientists headed to Nepal for post-quake assessments of potentially dangerous glacial lakes

Scientists headed to Nepal for post-quake assessments of potentially dangerous glacial lakes

A team of high altitude scientists, including INSTAAR affiliate Alton Byers, will deploy in Nepal to begin the process of assessing post-earthquake impacts on the country’s potentially dangerous glacial lakes.

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INSTAAR at AGU: Talks, posters, and sessions at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

INSTAAR faculty and graduate students will share new research at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in San Francisco, 15 to 19 December. They will present new research on abrupt climate change, air quality and fracking, polar climate change, atmospheric chemistry, flood impacts, forests and snow, plants and soils, and past climates.

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Sustainable Deltas 2015 launches in Rotterdam

Sustainable Deltas 2015 launches in Rotterdam

A unique initiative, Sustainable Deltas 2015 (SD2015), launched today at the Deltas in Times of Climate Change II International Conference in Rotterdam. The aim of the initiative is to focus attention and research on the value and vulnerability of deltas worldwide, and enhance international and regional cooperation among scientists, policymakers and other stakeholders.

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CWEST: A new partnership between CU and the USGS pushes collaboration, houses Hydro Sciences program

INSTAAR is pleased to announce the establishment of the Center for Water, Earth Science, and Technology (CWEST), which will promote increased collaboration between researchers at the University of Colorado–Boulder and the U.S. Geological Survey.

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Apples in Atebes: Cultivating climate resilience in an Ethiopian village

Apples in Atebes: Cultivating climate resilience in an Ethiopian village

Tsegay Wolde-Georgis, of the INSTAAR program Consortium for Capacity Building (CCB), is leading a project to introduce the cultivation of apple trees irrigated by water-filled, buried clay pots to the mountainous, dry region of Atebes, a village of 4000 people in northern Ethiopia. Over the last 30 years, land degradation and climate change have exacerbated existing constraints of drought, soil erosion, deforestation, poor food supply consisting entirely of cereal grains, and lack of access to water. The goal of the clay pot project is to improve the resiliency of the community to climate-related hazards through demonstration and capacity building. So far, the project has led not only to the cultivation of high-value fruits and vegetables, but to erosion control and improved water supplies.

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INSTAAR at AGU: Talks, posters, and sessions at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

INSTAAR faculty and graduate students will share their research at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting (http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2013/) held in San Francisco, 9 to 13 December. They will present new research on abrupt climate change, atmospheric chemistry, geomorphology, rivers and oceans, forests and snow, plants and soils, past climates, flood monitoring, Antarctic volcanoes, coastal erosion, and emissions from energy production.

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Mountain Research Station and Niwot Ridge post-rain event update

Mountain Research Station and Niwot Ridge post-rain event update

Climate Technician Jennifer Morse reports from Niwot Ridge and the Mountain Research Station after the recent historic rains and flooding. Everyone is okay, and the research sites are relatively unaffected. The most direct route to the Station remains closed and will be for some time.

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CU-Boulder-led team to study effects of natural gas development

CU-Boulder-led team to study effects of natural gas development

The NSF has awarded a $12 million grant to a CU-Boulder-led team, including the leaders of the CWERC research center, to explore ways to maximize the benefits of natural gas development while minimizing negative impacts on ecosystems and communities. The team will examine social, ecological and economic aspects of the development of natural gas resources, including fracking, and the protection of air and water resources. The project will focus on the Rocky Mountain region, where natural gas development, as well as objections to it, are increasing.

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CU-led mountain forest study shows vulnerability to climate change

CU-led mountain forest study shows vulnerability to climate change

A new University of Colorado Boulder-led study that ties forest “greenness” in the western United States to fluctuating year-to-year snowpack indicates mid-elevation mountain ecosystems are most sensitive to rising temperatures and changes in precipitation and snowmelt. Led by CU-Boulder researcher Ernesto Trujillo and Assistant Professor Noah Molotch, the study team identified the threshold where mid-level forests sustained primarily by moisture change to higher-elevation forests sustained primarily by sunlight and temperature. Being able to identify this “tipping point” is important because it is in the mid-level forests--at altitudes from roughly 6,500 to 8,000 feet--where many people live and play in the West and which are associated with increasing wildfires, beetle outbreaks and increased tree mortality.

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Increase in metal concentrations in Rocky Mountain watershed tied to warming temperatures

Increase in metal concentrations in Rocky Mountain watershed tied to warming temperatures

Warmer air temperatures since the 1980s may explain significant increases in zinc and other metal concentrations of ecological concern in a Rocky Mountain watershed, reports a new study led by CU-Boulder and the USGS. Rising concentrations of zinc and other metals in the upper Snake River just west of the Continental Divide near Keystone, Colo., may be the result of falling water tables, melting permafrost and accelerating mineral weathering rates, all driven by warmer air temperatures in the watershed. Researchers observed a fourfold increase in dissolved zinc over the last 30 years during the month of September.

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CU-Boulder scientists to give climate change programs at Rifle Public Library in August

In conjunction with the “Discover Earth: A Century of Change” exhibit, Jim White and Mark Williams will lead climate science-focused presentations at the Rifle Branch Library, 207 East Avenue, on Thursday, Aug. 9 and Thursday, Aug. 16.

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Front Range environment is changing fast, LTER studies find

Front Range environment is changing fast, LTER studies find

Six papers published this month in the journal BioScience report on ecological changes at 26 research sites, including INSTAAR’s Niwot Ridge site, adjacent to the Mountain Research Station west of Boulder. They indicate that ecosystems dependent on seasonal snow and ice are the most sensitive to changes in climate.

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Diane McKnight elected to National Academy of Engineering

Diane McKnight elected to National Academy of Engineering

Diane M. McKnight has been elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), among the highest professional distinctions accorded an engineer, for elucidating the interrelationship between natural organic matter and heavy metals in streams and lakes.

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Mark Williams elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

Mark Williams elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

Mark W. Williams has been elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Fellowship is conferred on less than 0.1% of the 60,000 AGU members from 148 countries in any given year and recognizes scientists who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences. The primary criteria for evaluation are major breakthroughs or discoveries and paradigm shifts. Williams was elected "for outstanding research that has made fundamental advances in mountain hydrology and biogeochemistry."

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Stream Team student blogs from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

Stream Team student blogs from the Dry Valleys of Antarctica

INSTAAR graduate student Alia Khan is blogging from one of the most remote field sites in the world. She is sending posts to the New York Times “Scientists at Work” series from a campsite in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica.

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USAID, CU-Boulder partner to study water resources in Asia mountains

USAID, CU-Boulder partner to study water resources in Asia mountains

One third of the world's population relies on water from the rivers originating in the high mountain ranges of Asia. USAID has commissioned CU-Boulder researchers to assess snow and glacier contributions to this water supply as part of a comprehensive look at freshwater resources in the area.

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NSF awards INSTAAR largest environmental sciences award in CU-Boulder history

NSF awards INSTAAR largest environmental sciences award in CU-Boulder history

A $5.9 million grant for alpine ecosystem research will allow INSTAAR to continue for six years its intensive studies of long-term ecological changes in Colorado's high mountains, both natural and human-caused, over decades and centuries. The grant is the largest environmental sciences award in CU-Boulder history.

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Stream paradox solved? Study uncovers why alga feasts where it should starve

Stream paradox solved? Study uncovers why alga feasts where it should starve

The diatom Didymosphenia geminata has emerged as a notorious invasive species in river systems around the world. Didymo is able to colonize and dominate the bottoms of some of the world’s cleanest waterways, forming thick mats. A team of scientists, including INSTAAR Sarah Spaulding, examined how high algal biomass is formed in low-nutrient conditions.

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Authors, teachers, scientists come together to advance children’s book series

Authors, teachers, scientists come together to advance children’s book series

Colorado teachers and scientific researchers joined forces with authors, illustrators, and book publishers at INSTAAR to work out next steps for the popular LTER Schoolyard Children’s Book Series, which includes My Water Comes from the Mountains, The Lost Seal, and Sea Secrets. They discussed how to develop web-accessible curricula associated with each book and move ahead with Spanish-language editions.

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James Syvitski elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

James Syvitski elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union

James Syvitski was elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) for "bringing new insights to the disciplines of oceanography, river and fjord processes, and sediment transport". Fellowship is bestowed on less than 0.1% of the total AGU membership of about 58,000 in any given year and recognizes scientists who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences.

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Elevated zinc in Colorado waterway likely a result of climate change

Elevated zinc in Colorado waterway likely a result of climate change

Caitlin Crouch and Diane McKnight found that rising concentrations of zinc in the Snake River watershed on Colorado's Western Slope may be the result of earlier spring snowmelt. They observed a four-fold increase in dissolved zinc over the last 30 years during September and October, the lowest water flow months. They also noticed that the low flows have become lower - and probably the soil along the stream drier - as air temperatures have risen and snowmelt has begun two to three weeks earlier.

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Diane McKnight elected AAAS fellow for 2009

Diane McKnight elected AAAS fellow for 2009

Diane McKnight is one of three CU-Boulder faculty members who have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for 2009. McKnight was honored for her outstanding contributions to coupled biogochemical and hydrologic processes.

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World’s river deltas sinking due to human activity

James Syvitski, Albert Kettner, Irina Overeem, Eric Hutton and Mark Hannon, along with colleagues from six other institutions, have shown that most of the world's low-lying river deltas are sinking from human activity, making them increasingly vulnerable to flooding from rivers and ocean storms and putting tens of millions of people at risk.

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Reducing “rock snot” in Boulder Creek

INSTAAR researchers have discovered the mechanisms behind blooms of an invasive alga in Boulder Creek--and a simple solution.

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New supercomputer for earth modeling research

New supercomputer for earth modeling research

James Syvitski led the effort to install a new supercomputer at INSTAAR that will vastly extend the ability of scientists across the globe to model and predict many important aspects of Earth's surface processes, from glacial melting and flooding to coastal erosion and tropical ocean storms. The new computer cluster is the heart of the NSF-funded Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS).

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Warming climate signals big changes for ski areas

Climate change will lead to substantially shorter ski seasons and less snow on lower slopes of the Rocky Mountains, greatly impacting Colorado's ski industry, INSTAAR scientists find.

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Beyond aluminum: New extreme of soil acidification found in Tatra Mountains

Bill Bowman, Cory Cleveland (former INSTAAR, U. of Montana), and colleagues at the Slovak Academy of Science and the U.S. Geological survey have found that vegetation and soils already subjected to long-term acid rain could face even more stress in the form of nitrogen-laden precipitation.

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The opening of a new landscape: Columbia Glacier at mid-retreat

Tad Pfeffer's new book on Alaska's Columbia Glacier represents not only a valuable contribution to the scientific literature, but a history of exploration and a stunningly beautiful photographic record of one of the most studied glaciers on the face of the earth.

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Humans continue to transform the global nitrogen cycle at a record pace, study finds

Alan Townsend and other members of the International Nitrogen Initiative (INI) North American Nitrogen Center have published a review of human influence on the global nitrogen cycle in Science.

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Boulder High School students present study at Intel International Science Fair

Boulder High School seniors Anna Hermann, Kelly Lane, and Danielle Pite were invited to the prestigious 2008 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair for their team project “Didymosphenia geminata: The core question,” mentored by USGS Ecologist and INSTAAR affiliate Sarah Spaulding.

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Alaska glacier speed-up tied to internal plumbing

Masters student Tim Bartholomaus with Bob and Suzanne Anderson have published their work on the sliding of Alaska's Kennicott Glacier. Their results show meltwater periodically overwhelms the interior drainpipes of the glacier and causes it to lurch forward, similar to processes that may help explain the acceleration of glaciers observed recently on the Greenland ice sheet that are contributing to global sea rise.

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Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory established

A University of Colorado team led by INSTAAR Suzanne Anderson was awarded funding by the National Science Foundation for a five-year project to establish a Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) in the Boulder Creek Watershed.

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James Syvitski to lead new NSF earth-surface modeling effort

Syvitski will be the executive director of a new NSF initiative, the Community Surface Dynamic Modeling System (CSDMS), which will study how landscapes and seascapes change over time, and how materials like water, sediments and nutrients are transported from one place to another. These studies will allow better predictions about areas at risk to phenomena like deforestation, forest fires, land-use changes and the impacts of climate change.

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Undergraduate mentoring: Sunlight’s effect on aquatic organic matter

Undergraduate Cuong Huynh (CU-Boulder) is being mentored by Natalie Mladenov and Diane McKnight on a project to uncover new ways in which sunlight affects aquatic organic matter.

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INSTAAR collaborates on local watershed curriculum: “MY H2O”

INSTAAR has created and distributed a teacher curriculum guide and resource kit promoting awareness of the Boulder and St. Vrain watersheds, blending Colorado state educational standards in science, language arts, geography and math into activities, educational games, story plots and community action tasks.

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Alan Townsend named director of North American Nitrogen Center

Alan Townsend was named director of the North American Nitrogen Center (NANC), one of five centers around the world that together comprise the core structure of the SCOPE and IGBP sanctioned International Nitrogen Initiative (INI).

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Grad student pens educational diary about science in Antarctica

Karen Cozzetto was the main contributor to an educational website, 77 Degrees South, that showcases the life, times, and research of several groups of scientists working in the largest ice-free region of Antarctica: the McMurdo Dry Valleys.

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Environmental engineers study pollution of Colorado mountain streams by mines

Diane McKnight (INSTAAR & CEAE) and Jeff Wong (CEAE) spoke with KUNC's Gavin McMeeking about the pervasive pollution of Colorado mountain streams by mining and the potential for remediation by environmental engineers.

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Humans have drastic effect on sediment transfer to world’s coasts, according to CU-Boulder study

A new analysis of data from more than 4,000 rivers around the world indicates humans are having profound and conflicting effects on the amount of sediment carried by rivers to coastal areas, with consequences for marine life and pollution control, according to INSTAAR scientist James Syvitski.

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Novel taxonomic web site assists ecological research in Antarctica

Sarah Spaulding, Rhea Esposito, and David Lubinski led a team of scientists, graduate students and undergraduate students to develop a dynamic web database, "Antarctic Freshwater Diatoms," that combines ecological data collected over more than a decade in the McMurdo Dry Valleys region.

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NSF awards CU-Boulder $4.9 million for alpine ecosystem research

An intensive University of Colorado at Boulder project charting long-term ecological changes in the high mountains of Colorado will continue for at least six more years as a result of a $4.9 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

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First evidence of life in rock glaciers

A University of Colorado at Boulder research team has discovered evidence of microbial activity in a rock glacier high above tree line in the Rocky Mountains, a barren environment previously thought to be devoid of life.

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Unseen Colorado mountain aquifers throw water on “Teflon Basin” myth

New University of Colorado at Boulder research shows high-altitude aquifers honeycomb parts of the Colorado Rockies, trapping snowmelt and debunking the myth that high mountain valleys act as "Teflon basins" to rush water downstream.

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Change in the air: Melting snow and ice in Colorado’s Front Range

A number of INSTAARs were interviewed in Rocky Mountain News stories about environmental change in the Colorado alpine.

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INSTAAR researchers featured in CU’s annual report on Sponsored Research

The LTER research on alpine lake ecosystems by Diane McKnight and Rose Cory were featured in the report on Sponsored Research for the University of Colorado at Boulder, fiscal year 2003-2004.

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INSTAARs distribute children’s book on Colorado’s water supply to local schools

INSTAARs distribute children’s book on Colorado’s water supply to local schools

INSTAAR faculty, researchers and graduate students visited several area elementary schools in May to hand deliver copies of a new children's book, My Water Comes from the Mountains, written by local educator Tiffany Fourment.

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INSTAAR-mentored high school students win science fair prizes

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High-elevation climate change: A new model for ecosystems

Tim Seastedt, Bill Bowman, Nel Caine, Diane McKnight, Alan Towsend, and Mark Williams (Niwot Ridge LTER PIs) published a key conceptual paper, "The Landscape Continuum: A Model for High-Elevation Ecosystems," in volume 54, no. 2 of Bioscience. Their paper employs a new conceptual model that links terrestrial ecosystems to each other and to aquatic ecosystems.

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Diane McKnight named fellow of American Geophysical Union

Diane McKnight was elected a fellow of the American Geophysical Union for her outstanding contributions to the understanding of the biogeochemistry associated with transport metals and organic substances in streams and lakes.

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Contaminated water from abandoned mines threatens Colorado ski areas

The ability of several of Colorado's prime ski areas to respond to winter drought is threatened by acidic runoff from abandoned mines, according to researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder and the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments. Contamination known as acid-rock drainage enters waterways, such as Summit County's Snake River, that are used for making artificial snow. When the snow melts, the water can run into streams not previously polluted, further spreading the contamination, said the research team.

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Diatoms on TV

Sarah Spaulding appeared on the Court TV special "Digging for Clues" on December 14, 2002.

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First depth measurement of Colorado’s largest glacier

Tad Pfeffer, Nel Caine, and colleagues measured the depth of the Arapaho Glacier west of Boulder at 22 meters (about 72 feet), in a study relevant to water use and environmental change in the Front Range.

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Sea-level changes: How Alaska affects the world

Mark Meier and Mark Dyurgerov have written a commentary for Science magazine that discusses the contributions of glacier melting in Alaska to global sea level rise.

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Wildfire erosion effects will show in reservoirs, ecosystems

At least three reservoirs likely will be contaminated by erosion in areas burned by this season's record wildfires, according to INSTAAR research assistant and graduate student John Gartner.

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Wildfires will hurt Colorado water quality and fish, CU-Boulder expert says

Mark Williams, Graduate Student John Gartner (Advisor: Nel Caine), and their colleagues are researching water quality and erosion issues related to wildfires. Williams predicts that Colorado's record-setting wildfire season will leave behind potentially harmful conditions in water supplies.

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Colorado alpine lakes show troubling changes

Diane McKnight, with colleagues including several graduate and undergraduate students, studied a high alpine lake in the Colorado Rockies that shows increased algal growth thought to be caused by changing climate and atmospheric nitrogen deposition from auto emissions and agricultural activity on the heavily populated Front Range.

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Mass balance of mountain and subpolar glaciers

Mark Dyurgerov and editors Mark Meier and Richard Armstrong (NSIDC) recently released the most complete glacier regime dataset for worldwide mountain and subpolar glaciers as INSTAAR Occasional Paper No. 55. This paper is not only a data collection, but a global analysis of glacier regime in connection with present-day climate, water balance, sea-level rise, and other environmental issues.

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University consortium formed for hydrologic sciences

Mark Williams is a co-PI for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, formed to assist the development of infrastructure for hydrologic science research.

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Colorado’s drought plan considers paleoclimatic record

Connie Woodhouse was cited in the recently published Colorado Drought Mitigation and Response Plan for her dendroclimatological work showing persistent periods of drought lasting longer than droughts in the instrumental record.

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Alaska’s speedy Columbia Glacier on disintegration course

Alaska's Columbia Glacier appears to be on course to disintegrate and evolve into a spectacular fjord rivaling Glacier Bay in the coming years, according to Tad Pfeffer.

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CU-Boulder awarded $2.6 million from NSF for Carbon, Climate and Society study

A $2.6 million National Science Foundation grant to the University of Colorado at Boulder will allow scores of students from the natural sciences, social sciences and journalism fields to join forces and explore novel solutions to environmental problems.

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In The News

Glacier-mapping drone soars to nearly 5000 meters, setting a record

High in the Peruvian Andes, Oliver Wigmore has helped open a new scientific frontier. The earth scientist has flown a data-collecting drone to nearly 5000 meters, the highest such flight ever reported in the scientific literature, he and colleague Bryan Mark report this week in The Cyrosphere.

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In Colorado, a global flood observatory keeps a close watch on Harvey’s torrents

The Science magazine web site interviews Bob Brakenridge of INSTAAR's Dartmouth Flood Observatory, pulling together data to help respond to Hurricane Harvey's flood damage.

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Long-term research in a polar desert reveals ecological legacies in Antarctica

Nature Ecology & Evolution "Behind the Paper" column: The McMurdo Dry Valleys are the largest ice-free area of Antarctica, and they host robust communities in their cold soils, intermittent streams, and ice-covered lakes. We have been studying this ecosystem since 1993, and our long-term data provide unique perspective on the resistance and resilience of this ecosystem.

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Ecosystem shift after a hot event

In Nature Ecology & Evolution, Gooseff et al. report the ecological effects of a heatwave that hit Antarctica’s McMurdo Dry Valleys during the Austral summer of 2001–2002. The authors’ assessment of long-term, detailed tracking of multiple elements in Antarctica’s largest ice-free oasis (a cold-desert ecosystem) demonstrates the impact of flooding associated with this extreme event and identifies step changes and substantial differences in response lag times across communities, as well as subsequent changes in climate.

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High water: Scientists trace the origin of the damming of the Arun River in April

Alton Byers reports on the trigger for and impact of a glacial lake outburst flood (Nepal Times).

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Researchers to study environmental, human impacts of nuclear war

Scientists and students led by CU Boulder and Rutgers University are calculating the environmental and human impacts of a potential nuclear wars using the most sophisticated scientific tools available. Led by CU Boulder Professor Brian Toon and Rutgers Professor Alan Robock, the study includes work by Nikki Lovenduski and students on how the oceanic food chain might change in response to the climatic disruption and enhanced ultraviolet radiation from nuclear explosions.

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Events

MS thesis defense: Sidney Bush

Friday, December 8th at 1:00pm

SEEC room S225

View all INSTAAR Terrestrial Hydrosphere science and research >