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INSTAAR News

Meet Julia Moriarty

Meet Julia Moriarty

Learn a bit about Dr. Julia Moriarty, a new INSTAAR scientist and an Assistant Professor in ATOC who studies processes in the coastal oceans.

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Sea ice triggered the Little Ice Age, finds a new study

Sea ice triggered the Little Ice Age, finds a new study

A new study finds a trigger for the Little Ice Age that cooled Europe from the 1300s through mid-1800s, and supports surprising model results suggesting that under the right conditions sudden climate changes can occur spontaneously, without external forcing.

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Newly funded project will investigate ‘the critical zone’ and the future of Western water

Newly funded project will investigate ‘the critical zone’ and the future of Western water

Three CU Boulder faculty, including INSTAARs Holly Barnard and Eve-Lyn Hinckley, are principal investigators on a new five-year, $6.9 million National Science Foundation grant to study the “critical zone”—from Earth’s bedrock to tree canopy top—in the American West.

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White paper sets priorities for Antarctic ice coring

Data from ice cores can show not only what Earth was like in prehistoric times, but how the mechanisms of climate work and how our climate may transform in the near future. INSTAAR research scientist Tyler Jones led an effort to synthesize ideas about the most meaningful, impactful questions that researchers might answer using ice cores from Antarctica. The result is a white paper that lays out priorities for ice core work in Antarctica for the next five to ten years.

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Alaska is getting wetter. That’s bad news for permafrost and the climate.

Alaska is getting wetter. That’s bad news for permafrost and the climate.

Alaska is getting wetter. A new study spells out what that means for the permafrost that underlies about 85% of the state, and the consequences for Earth’s global climate.

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Researchers find that heavy snowmelt plus usually warm temperatures amped up Oroville Dam incident

Researchers find that heavy snowmelt plus usually warm temperatures amped up Oroville Dam incident

In February 2017, failures in the spillways of Oroville Dam forced the evacuation of 188,000 people and caused $1 billion in damage repairs. According to scientists, including INSTAARs Keith Musselman, Leanne Lestak, and Noah Molotch, a warmer climate might create more dangerous events like this.

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