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Persistent places: A new project pulls together diverse groups to define and map climate change

Persistent places: A new project pulls together diverse groups to define and map climate change

A project that unites land managers, citizens, and scientists to jointly understand how Colorado Front Range ecosystems and public lands are responding to pressures from people and climate change has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

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Rare earth elements and old mines spell trouble for Western water supplies

Rare earth elements and old mines spell trouble for Western water supplies

Acid rock and mine drainage into Western streams is a problem. Climate change is making it worse.

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In memoriam: Rolf Kihl

In memoriam: Rolf Kihl

Rolf Kihl, a meticulous and inventive scientist who established INSTAAR’s Sedimentology Lab and ran it for decades, passed away on January 19, 2021. The INSTAAR community mourns his loss.

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The secret life of glaciers: Lake sediments reveal a 10,000 year record of climate and ice

The secret life of glaciers: Lake sediments reveal a 10,000 year record of climate and ice

A team of past and present INSTAAR researchers have reconstructed the history of Teton Glacier, Wyoming, by analyzing sediment from alpine lakes. Their work is documented in a new study published this week in Science Advances.

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Mette Bendixen receives the AGU Science for Solutions Award

Mette Bendixen receives the AGU Science for Solutions Award

The American Geophysical Union has announced that INSTAAR postdoctoral scholar Mette Bendixen is the recipient of their 2020 Science for Solutions Award. The award follows Bendixen’s out-of-the-box work on an overlooked global challenge: the scarcity of sand resources.

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Arctic communities planning for abrupt permafrost thaw

Arctic communities planning for abrupt permafrost thaw

A new INSTAAR-led project will engage Indigenous and Western knowledge systems to better understand abrupt permafrost change in Alaska. The National Science Foundation selected the project as part of its Navigating the New Arctic funding area, one of ten “Big Ideas” that NSF is investing in as an area of profound national challenge and opportunity. The research project brings Alaskan communities together with social and natural scientists to examine changes in permafrost thaw lake environments, including associated effects on villages in the Yukon River watershed.

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